Deer Urine Banned as Scent Attractant for Hunters Keeping Chronic Wasting Disease Out of Alaska July 16, 2012, ADF&G

Alaska Deer Disease News and Information Archive




Deer Urine Banned as Scent Attractant for Hunters Keeping Chronic Wasting Disease Out of Alaska July 16, 2012, ADF&G, By Riley Woodford
When deer hunting season opens in Alaska this August, hunters will no longer be able to use any scent attractants that contain deer or elk urine.
Hunters sometimes use urine-based scents to attract deer or to mask human scent. It is sold in hunting supply stores and through on-line catalogues. Most contain urine from domestic deer, often does in estrus. Deer and elk urine is possible route into Alaska for chronic wasting disease (CWD), a degenerative, fatal illness that affects deer, moose, and elk. The disease has not yet been found in Alaska and wildlife managers are working to keep it out.
“People were using doe urine as a lure in Southeast Alaska, and research has come out showing urine could transmit CWD,” said Kimberlee Beckmen, a veterinarian with the Alaska Department of Fish and Game. “Most urine is produced on game farms in states where they have CWD, and there are no regulations or standards in place to ensure that scents are disease free. This is a way to completely eliminate that risk factor.”



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