Urban Tick Studies

Connecticut Urban Deer Management News and Information Archive



Redding, Deer harvested on public land in Redding double from last year August 17, 2016 Connecticut, The Redding Pilot
... Twenty-seven deer were taken by hunters on public land in the 2015-2016 season ... over 140 deer were taken when the public hunting program started ...  in years past the town would often have harvests as high as 400 deer a year ... 

Greenwich, CT. FLIR Deer Survey 2016July 18, 2016 Connecticut, Bowsite.com, Glen Ekstrom [see also Redding News]
      In 2016 Vision Air Research was contracted to perform a Forward Looking Infrared survey to determine the deer population in Greenwich, CT. The survey was conducted between 1600-0200 hours; February 27-28, 2016. The results of this survey showed a total of 313 deer  located in 111 groups. Group size ranged from 1 – 10 deer with most deer groups in the 1 – 3 size range.
      The FLIR survey for Greenwich averaged 7.27 deer per square mile and should be compared to the estimated 22.4 or 44.8 corrected deer per square mile claimed by the DEEP for 2015 in Zone 11. The 2016 FLIR survey covered 43 square miles in Greenwich, 90% and therefore represents a true census of its whitetail deer population. In contrast, the DEEP transect surveys for 2015 are based on surveying only .3% of Greenwich. 
      By sampling only fractions of the town, the DEEP surveys can only reliably report the number of deer in those fractions. The CT DEEP attempts to extrapolate the results as town-wide numbers and as a result their numbers are grossly overstated. Wildlife seek out preferred habitat in a town and will never be equally distributed in any town. The repeat surveys merely demonstrate that anyone can repeat the same error multiple times and get the same wrong answer.   In the last six years Fairfield County, CT; Zones 11 and 12 have lost 50% of the deer through over harvest do to unlimited doe tags, baiting and the January harvest.

Discussion in Connectictut About Deer Population March 8, 2016 Bowsite.com, Summary by Glen Ekstrom
   Connecticut is claiming 100,000 deer in 2016; reality shows approximately 50,000; 1/2 of what the State claims. In 2007 Connecticut had 62,189 deer (mean statewide deer density) on their last statewide deer survey; since then we have lost approximately 20% of our herd, leaving approximately 50,000 deer or 10.32 dpsm. Throughout the last 15 years and even today the CT DEEP maintains there are approximately 20 dpsm throughout Connecticut to maintain their yearly license sales revenues for the general fund. [Data below]


White Birch Reviewed - One Year LaterFebruary 12, 2016 Connecticut, link to Bowsite.com
     Summary from the hunting group:  "The CT DEEP and the CAES's systematic campaign of misrepresenting the outcome of Mumford Cove is the principle driving factor for deer eradication throughout Fairfield County, CT., Zone 11.  Posing that outcome as "proof" that a drastic reduction in deer numbers (using inflated deer counts) will translate to a significant reduction in Lyme disease incidence represents a deliberate effort to prey on the fears of well-intentioned citizens (soccer moms) to achieve a desired outcome.
    The principle parties involved are fully aware of the fact that this correlation has yet to be demonstrated in open settings (not to mention the fact that many open settings show the exact opposite effect) yet they conveniently omit mention of these facts while peddling this misrepresentation from town to town."

   Use the link above to follow a discussion between local hunters and Dr. Scott Williams of the Connecticut Agricultural Experiment Station related to the effectiveness of conducting community deer culls to reduce the risk of contracting Lyme disease.  The group provides this summary of their position: 
      "For the past few years a vocal group of hunters has been telling state of Connecticut (CT) officials (CAES, CT DEEP) that the Mumford Cove study [see bottom left of this page] has been misrepresented as the "answer" to CT's Lyme disease epidemic.  What we have shown is there is no evidence to support those findings in open settings like Redding, CT and in fact there is evidence to suggest the contrary is true; more deer equals less Lyme disease (see graphs below of Westport, CT statistics).  This manipulation is not limited to just the non-hunting public; hunters are being misled into thinking this deer eradication approach will translate into increased opportunities for them.  The reality is to get to the deer densities advocated by the CAES it will require the use of sharpshooters at a considerable cost to the taxpayers and to the exclusion of CT's hunters."
     [Information provided by participants in the discussion]:  Westport, CT has seen a dramatic decline with their Lyme casesfrom 2005 (57) to 2012 (6) cases.  Westport has a stabile deer population of approximately 600 deer per a recent FLIR survey conduceted in 2012 and does not allow hunting in their town.  Redding, CT, on the other hand has used a "destroy all deer" mentality to try and eradicate Lyme with little success.  Redding's Lyme ases in 2005 were (18) cases and in 2012 (10) cases.  More complete information in PDF.


   Dr. Williams comments that as the information in the graph below shows, Lyme disease cases have "dropped precipitously in the last 15 years" when there was no hunting in the town of Westpoint based on "credible" data from the department of health:  [Below the long term graph, 2000 to 2014, of the number of reported cases of Lyme disease in Westport, CT, where the deer population has been relatively stable because the community decided not to cull their deer]


The CT DEEP is charged with the management of wildlife, [deer density not correlated to Lyme disease] January 18, 2016 Conneticut, ReddingNews.Info
... The town of Westport, CT does not allow hunting and surveys, one as recent as 2012, have shown that Westport has a stable population of approximately 600 deer, or a density of 26.8 deer per square mile. Interestingly enough, the city has seen a steady decline in the number of lyme disease cases, going from 57 cases in 2005 to just 1 confirmed case in 2014... Redding has seen an all-out siege on its deer herd the past four years resulting in a decrease of 80% in the deer herd, yet Redding has seen an increase in the number of reported cases of lyme disease...

Newton, Deer Survey Newtown, Connecticut January 15, 2016 ReddingNews
... In the last six years, Newtown has lost nearly one half of the deer we had in town... The DEEP attempts to extrapolate the results as town-wide numbers and as a result their numbers are grossly overstated ... read the current aerial survey [PDF] ...follow the discussion about this issue among concerned hunters [an excerpt from Bowsite.com in story below dated January 5]

[a comment taken from this thread] ... The CAES ground truthed 11 deer over the next 3 days and billed the tax payers $20,069.22 for their services. The 11 deer were taken over a 3 square mile area ( 2 ) test sites and in doing so negated a $950,000 study by over harvesting what was in the test sites areas. Vision Air had FLIR surveyed both test areas prior to the Davis survey and found only 23 deer and the CAES had been baiting the test ares prior to the Davis survey. By the CAES taking 11 of the 23 remaining deer that were left in the two test sites they were under their test site parameters by 8 deer. The test sites were to have 10 deer remaining per site and were stated to be 1 square mile each; when in fact they were just over three square miles combined, a 50% increase in size thus negated the test study again. And how do we know this, We were there and ground truthed it... [more information about problems in the deer count]

Newton, Deer Survey Newtown, Connecticut January 15, 2016 ReddingNews
... In the last six years, Newtown has lost nearly one half of the deer we had in town... The DEEP attempts to extrapolate the results as town-wide numbers and as a result their numbers are grossly overstated ... read the current aerial survey [PDF] ...follow the discussion about this issue among concerned hunters [an excerpt from Bowsite.com in story below dated January 5]



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