Wildlife Commission Adopts Resolution to Request Membership in Interstate Wildlife Violator Compact July 31, 2017 North Carolina

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Wildlife Commission Adopts Resolution to Request Membership in Interstate Wildlife Violator Compact July 31, 2017 North Carolina, NCWRC News

The N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission adopted a resolution on July 27, 2017 to formally request membership in the Interstate Wildlife Violator Compact (Compact), a voluntary reciprocal agreement among 47 states sharing sportsman hunting, fishing and trapping violations. The Compact promotes compliance with the statutes, laws, ordinances, resolutions, administrative rules and regulations relating to the management of wildlife resources and provides fair and impartial treatment of wildlife violators operating within the participating states. In 2008, the General Assembly passed G.S. 113-300.5 requiring North Carolina to adopt rules and join the Compact. The Commission’s adoption of this resolution was the last step needed to make application to join the Compact.

 

The violation of wildlife laws interferes with the management of wildlife resources and may endanger the safety of persons and property. The Compact establishes a process by which wildlife law violations conducted by a non-resident while in a member state may be handled as if the person were a resident in the state where the violation took place. This allows the individual to agree to appear in court, therefore preventing the individual from being arrested, booked and bonded.  This reduces the burden on court and jail facilities and reduces failure to appear and non-compliance cases. This process increases officer efficiency by allowing more time for enforcement duties rather than violator processing procedures that are required for arrest, booking and bonding of non-residents.

 

The Compact also includes a reciprocal recognition of license privilege suspension by member states, so any person whose license privileges are suspended in a member state may also have their license suspended in their home state, but only if the violation is a comparable and revocable offense in their home state.  Wildlife law violators are held accountable since their illegal activities in one state can affect their privileges in all participating states, including the individual’s home state. For example, if a North Carolina resident has their hunting privileges suspended in Virginia, their privileges may also be suspended in North Carolina and in all other compact states, only if the hunting violation is a comparable and revocable offense in their home state or other Compact state. This cooperative interstate effort will enhance the ability to protect and manage our wildlife resources for the benefit of citizens in all member states.

Hawaii and Massachusetts are not members of the Compact. State legislation, however, is pending in Massachusetts to enter the Commonwealth into the Compact and to update penalties for existing wildlife crimes.


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