2019 Oregon big game hunting forecast August 20, 2019

Oregon Deer Population, Management News and Information Archive

August 20, 2019, ODFW News

Statewide: The winter of 2018–2019 was generally warmer and drier than average for the state followed by one of the wettest and coldest Februarys on record. March saw areas of the state experience record or near record low temperatures. The early spring was generally wetter and colder than average for the state.

Western Oregon: Winter started with temperatures in December and January generally warmer than average. February was the opposite with average temperatures several degrees below average. In general, western Oregon had slightly below normal snowpack by the peak of the season. The lowest snowpack was in the Hood and Sandy, where the snowpack never fully recovered from early season deficits, despite record-breaking snow in February. Deer and elk survival appears to have been good with no reports of major mortality incidents.

Eastern Oregon: Fall was slightly cooler and wetter than normal. November and December had several winter storm events but overall eastern Oregon entered winter warmer and drier than average. Winter was a non-issue until February. February was the snowiest on record for all of Oregon and temperatures dropped well below average across eastern Oregon, as much as 15 to 20 degrees below normal. Snow accumulation was significant at higher elevations. Lower winter ranges received less snow with some areas receiving primarily rain. Heavy snow and rain later in the winter into spring resulted in flood conditions with standing and running water in places it had not been seen for decades.

... Along the mid-coast (western Stott Mt., western Alsea, north Siuslaw), overall deer numbers appear to be stable to increasing slightly in various areas, and buck numbers are fair to good in most areas. The 2018 and 2019 growing seasons were good, which has likely improved overwinter survival. The prevalence of deer hair loss syndrome continues to be present in the district during late winter and into spring, and mortalities continue to occur due to this syndrome...

... Deer population abundance appears to be stable in Coos County, overall. Deer herd dynamics such as buck ratio are measured after the general rifle buck season concludes each year to indicate how many bucks survived the hunting season and will be available the following season...

... The West Biggs and Maupin units both have buck ratios above management objective. Surveys indicate a buck ratio of 23 bucks per 100 does in the Maupin unit and 28 bucks per 100 does in the West Biggs unit. In the West Biggs unit, buck ratios are highest in the John Day River canyon at 29 per 100, mostly due to inaccessibility of vast areas within the canyon...The deer population in the White River unit continues to decline, mostly due to poor fawn recruitment. This year, overwinter fawn survival was slightly lower than last year but higher than the harsh winter of 2016/ 2017. As in 2018, surveys indicated a buck ratio of 18, which is under management objective for the unit...

... Buck ratios are at or above management objective for the Maury, Ochoco and Grizzly units, with a district-wide average of 20 bucks per 100 does. Over-winter fawn survival was lower than normal due to late-winter snow... In Upper Deschutes, Paulina, Metolius, N. Wagontire Wildlife Management units ...Buck ratios are near, or above, management objective district-wide with a ratio of 20 bucks per 100 does. Last winter’s tolerable conditions resulted in an increase in over-winter survival but spring fawn ratios are still down district-wide with a ratio of 39 fawns per 100 does. Low survival rates in both fawns and adult does continues to push populations below management objective in all units. Habitat loss, disturbance, poaching, predation, disease and road kill are contributing factors...

... Current black-tailed deer research in ongoing in a number of wildlife management units in the southwest area. Preliminary results show the local deer population is stable or slightly higher than previous projected.

... Spring surveys indicate good over-winter survival for deer and elk in the Douglas portion of the Umpqua District. The fawns per adult deer ratios in the Dixon, Indigo and Melrose have been stable to increasing over the last few years. Elk numbers in the Tioga Unit are close to population management objective and doing well ...  the strongest deer and elk populations occur on private lands where expansive timber harvest results in improved forage...

... Big game hunting statistics indicate that all units within Jackson, Josephine, and Curry counties had a decrease in black-tailed deer hunter success last year...

...  The West Biggs and Maupin units both have buck ratios above management objective. Surveys indicate a buck ratio of 23 bucks per 100 does in the Maupin unit and 28 bucks per 100 does in the West Biggs unit. In the West Biggs unit, buck ratios are highest in the John Day River canyon at 29 per 100, mostly due to inaccessibility of vast areas within the canyon...

... The deer population in the White River unit continues to decline, mostly due to poor fawn recruitment. This year, overwinter fawn survival was slightly lower than last year but higher than the harsh winter of 2016/ 2017. As in 2018, surveys indicated a buck ratio of 18, which is under management objective for the unit...

...The deer population in the White River unit continues to decline, mostly due to poor fawn recruitment. This year, overwinter fawn survival was slightly lower than last year but higher than the harsh winter of 2016/ 2017. As in 2018, surveys indicated a buck ratio of 18, which is under management objective for the unit...

...The deer population in the White River unit continues to decline, mostly due to poor fawn recruitment. This year, overwinter fawn survival was slightly lower than last year but higher than the harsh winter of 2016/ 2017. As in 2018, surveys indicated a buck ratio of 18, which is under management objective for the unit...

... Deer populations in Lake County continue to be below management objectives ... 

...  All Harney units are currently below population management objective (MO) for deer although the district is seeing an increasing trend in most units over the past 7-8 years...

... Owyhee Unit, the northern portion of the unit will take some time to recover from the severe winter of 2016-17...

... Northeast:  Over-winter survival was fair in all units with average fawn ratios of 29 per 100 adults counted in the spring. Heavy snow in late winter hurt fawn survival...The Beulah unit, is still recovering from the winter of 2016-17 with a fawn ratio of 24/100 adults. The buck ration is 14/100 does, which is just below the buck management objective of 15/100 does...

... Buck ratios were below management objective in the Northside and Desolation units but above in Murderers Creek and Heppner units. Spring fawn ratios were a little lower than desired, which is likely due to last year’s dry summer...

... Elk and deer numbers are stable throughout the Union County. Elk came through the winter well and calf survival is up ...

... Mule deer survival rates were good considering the harsh winter we experienced here in Umatilla County. However, mule deer numbers are below management objectives in all units...  Whitetail deer continue to expand in numbers and range across the district... 

     

  



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